• THE-COFFEE-GUIDE.gif 
  • QA 052
    Question:
    How do producing and consuming countries, and the ICO, promote coffee consumption?
    Background:
    It would be useful to understand what promotion activities different countries undertake to increase coffee consumption by both producers and consumers. Also, what activities are undertaken by the International Coffee Organization in this respect.
    Asked by:
    Student - Cote d'Ivoire
     
    Answer:

    The coffee industry conducts numerous promotion campaigns to increase coffee consumption generally. In fact such initiatives are too numerous to mention individually. The following is therefore a brief overview with hints where to obtain more detailed information.

    The International Coffee Organization or ICO -www.ico.orgdeals with the generic promotion of coffee consumption - that is to say the ICO promotes coffee consumption as a whole, on behalf of all producers without specifying any particular origin, any particular type of coffee or any individual manufacturer. Recent campaigns have targeted countries as diverse as the Russian Federation and China, both markets with enormous potential for growth. But the ICO also supports promotion in established markets, together with organizations as the European Coffee Federation - www.ecf-coffee.org, the National Coffee Association of the USA - www.ncausa.org, and others.

    Individual manufacturers/roasters play an enormous role in the promotion of coffee but of course under their own brands. However, each marketing campaign that draws attention to coffee as an attractive beverage is good for all coffee!

    Individual producing countries are increasingly mounting their own campaigns as well. Not only to increase awareness generally of their particular coffee but also to promote domestic consumption within their own population. Examples are Colombian efforts to promote 100% pure Colombian coffee, including the establishment of own retail shops in importing countries, and Brazil's outstanding success with its domestic Purity Seal campaign that has made the country into the world's second largest consumer of coffee!

    Of course a number of existing, well established markets are 'mature' - that is to say there is not that much scope for further increases in per capita consumption of coffee, for example in Scandinavian countries. Hence the ICO's strong focus on 'new' markets as China. However, the amount of coffee drunk within coffee producing countries themselves is relatively small as well with only Brazil and Ethiopia being able to boast a large domestic market.

    There is considerable scope for increasing consumption in almost all producing countries and, as a result, more and more attention is being paid to the promotion of coffee consumption by producers themselves. Realizing that a strong domestic market is a huge asset to any coffee exporting country, the ICO has therefore commissioned "A Step-by-step Guide to Promote Coffee Consumption in Producing Countries". This offers a complete review of the Brazilian experience to increase coffee consumption and can be downloaded from www.ico.org . It is a most useful tool for anyone wishing to acquaint themselves with the Brazilian experience and to learn how to adapt those methods to their own domestic market.

    To read more about promotion generally go to section 02.12 of the Guide. For more information on the Brazilian experience go to section 02.07. For information on individual promotion efforts in European countries see the ECF's Annual Report for 2004 under Publications at www.ecf-coffee.org . Go to www.ncausa.org for information on activities in the USA.

    Posted 14 October 2005-10-15

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